Tag Archives: Orange County

Understanding Urinary Incontinence In Women | Fullerton, CA

It is estimated that for ten million Americans (85% of whom are women), incontinence of urine is socially embarrassing, physically limiting, or a significant disability. In fact, after psychiatric and neurological disorders, the uncontrollable or accidental loss of urine is the second most common reason individuals are placed in nursing home facilities.

Among women, between the ages of 45-64, 40% are estimated to have experienced incontinence of urine. Women often perceive that their problem is a normal result of bearing children and getting older, and therefore just cope with it. The true number of non-institutionalized women who have quietly altered their lives because of accidental loss of urine is actually unknown because they are reluctant to discuss their urinary incontinence. Women are frequently embarrassed and hesitant to admit their problems to their family, friends, or even to their personal physician.

However, they also limit exercising, dancing, traveling, and other activities, which would otherwise require them to be away from nearby toilet facilities. They frequently will change the style of clothes they wear to avoid embarrassment.

Urinary incontinence occurs when there is a sudden increase in abdominal pressure during certain activities such as laughing, coughing, sneezing, running, bending, lifting, etc. The primary cause of the problem is a weakness of the pelvic tissues (prolapse), which normally supports the bladder (cystocele) and its sphincter. The amount of urine loss with each episode of stress, varies with the degree of weakness, the volume of urine in the bladder, and the intensity of the abdominal pressure. Yet, urinary incontinence is a symptom of a condition, which is not normal and usually can be successfully treated to restore normal bladder function.

There is a type of urinary incontinence known as urge incontinence, in which someone perceives the urgent need to urinate, and will likely fail to get there in time. The amount of urine loss can vary with the cause of the urge, the volume of urine in the bladder, and the strength of the pelvic tissue. The most common physical cause is an infection of the bladder (cystitis) and/or urethra (urethritis), and it is corrected with the treatment of the infection. There are other causes such as chronic inflammation of the bladder, polyps or tumors, and certain medications. When no physical cause can be found after a complete medical evaluation, the cause is usually a result of a learned habit. Treatment may include medications, bladder retraining programs, and pelvic floor muscle exercises (Kegel exercises).

There are other less common, but important types of urinary incontinence:

Overflow incontinenceis a frequent spilling of a small amount of urine when the bladder is over-distended and can occur with certain medications, after pelvic surgery, or trauma.

Reflex incontinenceis the loss of urine when the person is completely unaware of the need to urinate, such as while sleeping or washing their hands. This type of incontinence may indicate an underlying neurological disorder.

The first step in correcting urinary incontinence is sharing the problem with your physician. Before your visit, you will be asked to fill out a patient history for urinary function form. This form should be completed prior to your office consultation.

You may be given a two-day “voiding diary” to record the number of liquids you drink and the number of times and amount you urinate during the day and night. You will also list the circumstances under which you regularly experience urinary urgency or incontinence.

After your patient history, physical examination, and voiding diary are completed and reviewed, simple office tests are performed which will further identify the primary cause of your incontinence. Once the cause (or causes) is determined, the proper treatment and alternative will be recommended and explained. Treatment begins with having a thorough understanding of normal urinary function, the cause of your urinary problem, and your treatment alternatives. Successful treatment is a patient-physician team mission and is an achievable goal.

If you would like more information on cholesterol, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gordon Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

Menopause and Hormone Therapy | Fullerton, CA

Menopause is a natural occurrence in which a woman’s ovaries cease producing estrogen, usually in their early fifties. Post-menopause is diagnosed when a woman has not menstruated for one year and marks the end of the reproductive period of her life.

Perimenopause is diagnosed when the menstrual cycles vary in frequency and length indicating a woman’s cycle is ending, and may be associated with psychological, emotional, and/ or physical symptoms. These disturbances are due to a declining ovarian production of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone that may be periodic or continuous.

The history of hormone replacement in women has seen many swings in popularity over the past few decades. In 1991 the National Institutes of Health (N.I.H.) launched the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) study involving about 161,000 healthy postmenopausal women aged 50-79 years with an average age of 63 years. The study was designed to test the effects of hormone therapy on heart disease, bone fractures, breast cancer, and colon cancer. One group of women who had undergone a hysterectomy received oral estrogen (Premarin) alone [estrogen replacement therapy or ERT].

A second group received a combination of Premarin and progesterone (PremPro) [combination hormone replacement therapy or HRT]. A third group received a placebo, which contained no hormones. In 2002 the study was stopped because the Provera group was associated with a slight increase in the incidence of breast cancer, heart attack, stroke, and blood clots.

Millions of women in the U.S. stopped their hormones out of fear and they entered into “hot-flash hell”. A recent careful re-analysis and follow-up review of the data has revealed that the actual risks of breast cancer, stroke, and heart disease were not increased over time and were, in fact, decreased; especially in women who were perimenopausal when they initiated hormone therapy.

Following years of fear and confusion regarding the risks and benefits of estrogen replacement therapy, medical studies have now clearly established its safety and its health benefits. In March 2012 the North American Menopause Society released a statement that supports these findings, stating that combination hormone therapy (both estrogen and progesterone) initiated around the time of menopause is safe.

Gunn Center of Fullerton, CA offers some interesting and useful information on menopause and hormone therapy. If you would like more information, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today.

Dr. Gordon Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

A Guide to Cholesterol | Fullerton, CA

How much do we really understand about the different types of cholesterol, how high cholesterol can impact our health, and what we can do about mitigating the likelihood we develop high cholesterol? Many don’t, so we have put together a guide so you can better understand cholesterol, and make informed decisions for your well-being. To start, the liver produces 90% of the body’s cholesterol and does so while we sleep, while only 10% of cholesterol is derived from the foods we eat.

Cholesterol is an essential building block for the normal metabolism of the body. Cholesterol is a type of fat known as a lipid. Lipids cannot circulate alone in the bloodstream, they require a means of transportation. Water-soluble proteins, called lipoproteins transport cholesterol in the blood, and the amount of lipoprotein determines how much cholesterol can be moved. The three types of lipoproteins are:

High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) – This is casually known as “good” cholesterol because it removes cholesterol from arterial plaque and transports it back to the liver to be metabolized. If the plaque within an artery were to build to the point it begins to restrict the flow of blood to the heart, a heart attack may ensue.

Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) – This is the “bad” cholesterol your doctor will warn you about because it deposits cholesterol into the inflamed plaque of the artery wall.

Very Low-Density Lipoprotein (VLDL) – This lipoprotein is created by your liver to be released into the bloodstream and is considered “bad” for your health. It mainly carries triglycerides (another type of fat) to your tissues, and if we have this in high volumes, it can put us at risk for a stroke.

To calculate your cholesterol levels, your doctor will evaluate the sum of all three of these lipoproteins and your triglycerides to generate a lipid profile. Then, total cholesterol is divided by your high-density lipoprotein level, resulting in your cholesterol ratio number, and you want it to be low.

The implication of high cholesterol on your health is an increased risk that the fatty deposits along the walls of your artery or arteries clot, and cause a heart attack or stroke. While you may be able to survive a heart attack or stroke, it can be fatal. Thankfully, you can begin to restore the health of your arteries by incorporating heart-healthy foods into your diet, regularly exercising, drinking alcohol in moderation, losing weight, and quit smoking if you are someone who does smoke. 

If you would like more information on cholesterol, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gordon Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

Daily Habits to Maintain Healthy Blood Pressure | Fullerton, CA

One of the most common diseases afflicting Americans is hypertension or high blood pressure. While many enlist the help of medication to lower their blood pressure, that is not the only way to mitigate the associated risks. If you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure or are at risk due to your lifestyle or habits, it’s important to understand easy changes that may dramatically improve your disposition.

Diet. The foods we eat and beverages we regularly consume are correlated to our blood pressure. Foods saturated in fat and cholesterol increase blood pressure, but fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy can help lower it.

Mind your weight. As your weight fluctuates, so can your blood pressure. An increase or decrease of 10 pounds may not seem like a lot, but it can make a big difference in your blood pressure.

Reduce Stress. When we become stressed, our cortisol increases and our blood pressure rises. To maintain or reduce your blood pressure, analyze the stressors in your life and find activities that help you overcome those stressors.

Watch your sodium intake. Even seemingly harmless amounts of sodium intake can adversely affect your blood pressure. If you are at risk or have recently been diagnosed with hypertension; begin reading food labels, reduce the amount of processed foods in your diet, and don’t oversaturate your meals with salt.

Exercise. Your blood pressure fluctuates, but cardio-driven activities such as walking, swimming, cycling, and dancing are all great activities to help reduce blood pressure.

If you would like more information on blood pressure, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. Dr. Gordon Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

Depression | Fullerton, CA

Depression is a common illness that can affect anyone, especially during this time of year. About one in twenty Americans (more than 11 million people) suffers from depression every year, and it occurs twice as often in women as in men. Depression is a medical disorder that can be treated.

Depression is a medical disorder, like heart disease and thyroid disease. It is more than feeling sad for a short time or feeling grief after a loss. These feelings are difficult to cope with, but they usually get better with time. Depression disrupts your daily life, and affects your thoughts, feelings, behavior and physical health. It is not a weakness, or a fault and it is not something you can ‘just get over’. Depression has been associated with many causes:

  • Chemical imbalances in the brain
  • Family history of depression
  • Other illnesses
  • Use of drugs or alcohol
  • Extreme stress or grief
  • Depression caused by a specific situation, sometimes triggers true depression

Symptoms of Depression

The period of time when you experience symptoms of depression is called an episode. An episode lasts at least two weeks with several symptoms occurring every day.

  • Lack of interest in things that you normally enjoy
  • Feeling sad, blue, or “down in the dumps”
  • Feeling sluggish or restless, and not able to sleep
  • Feeling worthless or guilty
  • Experience a change in appetite with either weight gain or weight loss
  • Thoughts of death or suicide, or attempt to commit suicide
  • Problems concentrating, thinking, remembering or making decisions
  • Sleeping too much or not able to fall asleep, or stay asleep through the night
  • Lack of energy and feeling tired all of the time

Depression may vary in severity from mild to severe. If you have mild depression, you will only have a few symptoms. It takes an extra effort to do the things you have to do, but you can usually accomplish those tasks. Moderate depression means you have many symptoms, and you may not be able to do things you need to do. If you have severe depression, you have nearly all the symptoms of depression. This type of depression almost always keeps you from performing your daily tasks.

Diagnosing Depression

A doctor diagnoses depression after assessing both your physical and mental condition. In looking for the cause of your depression, the provider will ask questions about other medical problems, use of certain medications, and the use of drugs or alcohol. Blood chemistries, including a thyroid work-up should be current, and if not, will be ordered. If your doctor determines that a medical problem may be causing your depression, treating that problem may correct your depression.

Treatment of Depression

Treatment may include antidepressant medication, psychotherapy or both. Antidepressant medications are helpful and are used to treat mild, moderate and severe depression. Antidepressants relieve symptoms in more than half of the people who take them. They work by changing the balance of chemicals in the brain. Most people who take them start to feel better after a few weeks. There are several types of antidepressant medication. All antidepressant medications can have some side effects. About half the people who take them will experience some side effects early in their treatments, usually within the first 2 weeks. Side effects usually subside after 2 to 4 weeks.

Common Side Effects

Dry mouth

Nausea

Dizziness

Constipation

Skin rash

Feeling sleepy or having trouble sleeping

Gaining or losing weight

Feeling restless

Decreased sex drive (libido)

Serious Side Effects (uncommon):

Trouble urinating

Heart problem

Seizures

Fainting

Finding the Right Antidepressant Medications

When an anti-depressant medication is recommended to relieve the symptoms of depression, your doctor will prescribe one from the following categories:

A. SSRI’s (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors)

First introduced in the 1980’s, the overall side effects of SSRI drugs tend to be less severe than the older antidepressants known as tricyclic (TCA) antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI’s). SSRI’s helped restore the brain’s chemical balance by increasing the available supply of the chemical messenger called serotonin (a neurotransmitter). SSRI’s appear to relieve depression by increasing serotonin levels without affecting the other chemicals in the brain and have fewer side effects than those of the MAOI’s and TCA’s. Available SSRI’s include: Celexa, Lexapro, Paxil and Paxil CR, Prozac and Zoloft.

B. SNRI’s (Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors)

Similar to the SSRI class of anti-depressants as discussed above, SNRI’s also blocks the reuptake of another neurotransmitter, norepinephrine, in addition to serotonin.

Available SNRI’s include:

  • Remeron – good choice with weight loss, poor appetite or hypertension
  • Serzone – similar to Remeron; good choice with insomnia or anxiety
  • Effexor & Effexor XR – beneficial in anxiety and panic disorders
  • Pristiq – works within 2 weeks; no weight gain; minimal sexual dysfunction.

C. Other Available Antidepressants

  • Wellbutrin (Buproprion) – Blocks reuptake of dopamine. Cannot mix with alcohol, increases seizures; can cause weight loss.

For more information about depression contact the following organizations:

National Institute of Mental Health

6001 Executive Blvd., Room 8184 MSC 9663

Bethesda, MD 20892-9663

1-800-421-4211

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/depression.cfm

National Mental Health Association

1021 Prince Street

Alexandria, VA 22314-2971

1-800-969-NMHA (6602)

http://www.nmha.org

National Alliance of the Mentally Ill

Colonial Place 3

2107 Wilson Blvd., Suite 3000

Arlington, VA 22201-3042

1-800-950-NAMI (6264)

http://www.nami.org

If you would like more information about depression, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

What Breast Cancer Symptoms to Watch for | Fullerton, CA

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among American women, affecting around 268,600 women and men each year. Breast cancer does not discriminate; it affects people of all ages and races. One of the first steps we can take towards effectively identifying and treating breast cancer is by taking preventive action and being aware of the symptoms that come along with this terrible disease. The following list includes breast cancer symptoms that we should all be aware of:

The way the breast or nipple feels

  • Nipple tenderness, lump or thickening in or near your breast or underarm area
  • Change in the texture of your skin or enlargement of the pores of your breasts
  • A lump in your breast (even if it’s small make sure to see professional for a screening)

Breast or nipple appearance

  • Any unexplained change in size or shape of your breast
  • Dimpling anywhere on your breast
  • Unexplained swelling of your breast
  • Unexplained shrinkage of your breast
  • Recent unexplained asymmetry of your breast. It’s common for women to have one breast larger than the other.
  • Your nipple is slightly inward or inverted
  • Skin of your breast, areola, or nipple that becomes red, scaly or swollen or resembles the skin of an orange

Nipple discharge

Particularly if you have clear discharge or bloody discharge

Most times these symptoms are not due to cancer, but if you have any breast cancer symptoms you should be seen by your doctor immediately to be sure you’re healthy and cancer free. Your doctor is the expert and will always be able to check for breast cancer before you have any noticeable symptoms.

If you would like more information about breast cancer symptoms, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

Women and Urinary Incontinence | Fullerton, CA

An estimated 33 million people – 80% which are women – suffer from an overactive bladder. Urinary incontinence, also known as bladder incontinence, is the loss of bladder control. In some cases, individuals suffer from a total loss of bladder contents, or it may just cause minor leakage. This issue is more than just medical problem; it can affect emotional, psychological and social life as well.

There are many people who think urinary incontinence comes with age, but it is actually a symptom that can be caused by many conditions. However, the cause of urinary incontinence differs between men and women. Urinary incontinence is separated into three different types, and some may experience a mix of the types or all three. The following includes the three different types of urinary incontinence:

Stress incontinence. This type of incontinence occurs when you apply pressure on your bladder by exercising, laughing, sneezing, coughing or lifting something heavy. The activity causes the sphincter to weaken and release urine.

Urge incontinence. Urge incontinence occurs when you feel the sudden, intense urge or need to urinate. Often times, after feeling the urge to go you won’t have time between the urge and the loss of urine to make it to the restroom.

Overflow incontinence. This type occurs when you experience frequent dribbling or urine, due to the fact that your bladder doesn’t empty completely.

There are lots of devices and products that can collect and hold urine. Not only will they help manage bladder leakage, but they will give older and disabled people more freedom to enjoy life. If you find you’re having issues with your bladder, consult your medical professional about your options.

If you would like more information about urinary incontinence, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

Eat Your Way to a Healthy Heart | Fullerton, CA

Heart disease kills on average 2,200 thousand Americans a day and one of the key risks for developing heart disease is clogged arteries. Clogging of the arteries doesn’t happen overnight, but there are foods that can help unclog your arteries of plaque buildup:

Garlic. According to studies, garlic powder can reduce the buildup of nanoplaque.

Chia seeds. This superfood can help keep arteries clear by regulating blood pressure, lowering triglycerides and reducing LDL cholesterol.

Coconut oil. Despite popular belief that all saturated fats are bad, a regular consumption of coconut oil can help reduce plaque buildup in the arteries.

Broccoli. This vegetable is loaded with vitamin K which can help prevent the hardening and calcification of arteries and prevent oxidation of LDL cholesterol which can lead to serious heart problems.

Avocado. Studies have shown that avocado can lead to improved blood cholesterol, while lowering LDL and triglycerides and increasing the HDL, the good cholesterol that help keep arteries clear.

Asparagus. Full of fiber and minerals, asparagus is one of the best veggies for clearing arteries and lowering cholesterol prevent blood clots that could potentially cause serious illness.

Green tea. Green tea contains high levels of catechins, which is an antioxidant plant phenol that hinders the absorption of bad cholesterol during digestion and helps reduce blocked arteries and improve blood-lipid levels.

Cold-water fish. Eating fish rich in healthy fats twice a week can help clear arteries, reduce inflammation and plaque buildup.

Turmeric. Turmeric’s main component is curcumin which a powerful anti-inflammatory, so it can help reduce inflammation and damage to your arterial walls, the leading cause to plaque buildup and blood clots.

Cranberries. Full of antioxidants, cranberries can help improve cardiovascular health by reducing LDL cholesterol and raising HDL cholesterol levels.

If you would like more information about heart-healthy foods, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

What You Need to Know About Omega-3s | Fullerton, CA

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on October 21, 2020

Not all fats are unhealthy. Omega-3 fatty acids are one of the “good” types of fat. They may help lower the risk of heart disease, depression, dementia, and arthritis. Your body can’t make them. You have to eat them or take supplements.

Omega-3 fatty acids come in more than one form. The types found in fish, called DHA and EPA, seem to have the strongest health benefits. Another form known as ALA is found in vegetable oils, flaxseed, walnuts, and dark leafy vegetables such as spinach. The body can change a small amount of ALA into EPA and DHA, but not very well.

Omega-3 also helps your heart in several ways. They curb inflammation in the blood vessels (and the rest of your body). At high doses they also make abnormal heart rhythms less likely and lower your level of blood fats called triglycerides. Finally, they can slow plaque buildup inside the blood vessels.

The American Heart Association recommends 1 gram a day of EPA plus DHA for people with heart disease. Eating oily fish is best, but your doctor might recommend a fish oil capsule. If you’ve had a heart attack, a prescription dose of omega-3s may help protect your heart. Some studies show fewer heart attacks and fewer heart disease deaths among heart attack survivors who boosted their levels of omega-3s. Omega-3s seem to have a stabilizing effect on the heart by lowering heart rate and helping prevent arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms). Several common sources of omega-3s are fish, walnuts, broccoli, and edamame (green soybeans that are often steamed and served in the pod).

DHA and EPA can lower your triglycerides, a blood fat that’s linked to heart disease. Talk with your doctor before taking omega-3 supplements, because some types can make your “bad” cholesterol worse. You can also bring down triglyceride levels by exercising, drinking less alcohol, and cutting back on sweets and processed carbs like white bread and white rice.

Omega-3s can help lower blood pressure a bit. If you have high blood pressure, limiting salt is probably one of the things your doctor has recommended. Foods and supplements curb plaque buildup inside blood vessels, helping with blood flow. So, they may help prevent stroke caused by clots or a blocked artery. But at high doses, omega-3 supplements might make bleeding-related stroke more likely, so check with your doctor.

Studies suggest omega-3s can curb joint pain and stiffness in people with rheumatoid arthritis. A diet high in omega-3s may also boost the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory drugs.

Depression is rarer in countries where people eat a lot of omega-3s. But omega-3s aren’t a treatment for depression. If you’re depressed, talk with your doctor about what might help you feel better. Some studies suggest omega-3 supplements may ease the symptoms of ADHD. Omega-3 fatty acids are important in brain development and function. They may provide some added benefits to traditional treatment, but they don’t replace other treatment.

There’s some evidence that omega-3s may help protect against dementia and age-related mental decline. In one study, older people with a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids were less likely to get Alzheimer’s disease. More research is needed to confirm the link.

Be wary of promises that omega-3s have “brain-boosting” powers for children. The Federal Trade Commission asked supplement companies to stop that claim unless they can prove it scientifically. The American Academy of Pediatrics does recommend that kids eat fish, but it cautions against types that are high in mercury, such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish.

The best source of omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA is fish. Some varieties deliver a higher dose than others. Top choices are salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines, anchovies, and tuna. The American Heart Association recommends at least two servings a week of fish. A serving is 3.5 ounces of cooked fish or 3/4 cup of flaked fish. Tuna can be a good source of omega-3s. Albacore tuna (often labeled “white”) has more omega-3s than canned light tuna, but it also has a higher concentration of mercury contamination. The amount of omega-3s in a fresh tuna steak varies, depending on the species.

The FDA encourages people to eat fish, and for most people, mercury in fish is not a health concern. But the FDA has this advice for young children and for women who plan on becoming pregnant, are pregnant, or are nursing:

  • Eat 8-12 ounces of fish per week (which is equal to 2 or 3 servings a week). Provide kids age-appropriate portion sizes. Limit albacore tuna to 6 ounces per week.
  • Choose fish lower in mercury, such as salmon, shrimp, pollock, tuna (light canned), tilapia, catfish, and cod.
  • Avoid shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish.
  • When eating fish caught locally, check fish advisories or limit fish to 6 ounces for women and 1-3 ounces for children and do not eat fish for the rest of the week.

If you don’t like fish, you can get omega-3s from supplements. One gram per day is recommended for people with heart disease but ask your doctor before starting. High doses can interfere with some medicines or increase risk of bleeding. You may notice a fishy taste and fish burps with some supplements. Read the label to find the amounts of EPA, DHA, or ALA you want. If you don’t eat fish or fish oil, you can get a dose of DHA from algae supplements. Algae that are commercially grown is generally considered safe, though blue-green algae in the wild can contain toxins. Vegetarians also can get the ALA version of omega-3 from foods such as canola oil, flaxseed, walnuts, broccoli, and spinach — or products fortified with omega-3s.

Many food products now boast that they have added omega-3s to support various aspects of your health. But be aware that the amount of omega-3s they contain may be minimal. They may contain the ALA form of omega-3s, which hasn’t yet shown the same health benefits as EPA and DHA. For a measured dose of omega-3s, taking fish oil supplements may be more reliable.

If you would like more information about omega-3s, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.

11 Steps to Lower Your Blood Pressure | Fullerton, CA

High blood pressure is not only a common affliction, but also the precursor of a more serious issue. This is when changes really need to be made in order to improve the way your blood circulates through your system. It isn’t impossible, but it will take an effort getting used to this new way of living…

Monitor blood pressure at home. This will result in a more accurate assessment of your blood pressure.

Exercise regularly. Regular exercise improves blood vessel flexibility and heart function. It can be as simple as walking regularly and may decrease blood pressure by 10 points.

Eat well. The American Heart Association recommends the ‘Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension’ (DASH) diet. This diet emphasizes fruits and vegetables, low fat dairy products, whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts.

Lose weight, if overweight. Losing even 10% of your current weight can make a big difference.

Stop smoking. Nicotine constricts blood vessels and can cause a 20-point increase in your B.P.

Drink alcohol in moderation. Limit to one drink a day for women & two for men.

Limit salt intake. Too much sodium and too little potassium can increase blood pressure in people who are sensitive to salt. Aim for less the 1.5 grams of sodium and more than 4.7 grams of potassium daily.

Sleep at least 7-8 hours a night. Chronic sleep deprivation can contribute to high blood pressure and increased chance of developing heart disease.

Reduce stress. Mental and emotional stress can increase blood pressure. Meditation lowers stress and your blood pressure.

Take prescribed blood pressure medication. Taking blood pressure pills can keep you from having a stroke or heart attack.

Blood uric acid. Make sure your level is optimal.

If you would like more information about lowering your blood pressure, contact Dr. Gordon C. Gunn MD at 714-912-2211 or visit www.gordongunnmd.com to schedule an appointment today. 

Dr. Gunn proudly serves Fullerton and all surrounding areas.